Upwards arrow

Visit ashbourne

#DISCOVERASHBOURNE

Discover Ashbourne

Ashbourne is a special place to live and to visit, surrounded by beautiful countryside on the edge of the Peak District, with an abundance of local amenities and close to world class visitor attractions such as Alton Towers and The Tissington Trail.

Experience the shops and cafes, soak up the the ancient history and explore the medieval street layout - why not come and discover it for yourself?

Where to stay in and around Ashbourne

Ashbourne is the perfect choice for a short break or a longer holiday. Our accommodation page aims to list everything within 5 miles of the town centre, with filters for B&B, campsites etc to help narrow down your choice.

where to stay

Car parking in Ashbourne

To properly explore Ashbourne’s shops, alleyways and eateries takes all day so it's worth choosing long stay parking. Follow the link for our dedicated parking page

all about car parks

Directions

Use DE6 1DR to set your sat nav for one of the long-stay car parks in the centre of Ashbourne.

google map
Hand drawn map with Ashbourne in the centre showing main roads and nearby towns

Ashbourne bus services

Ashbourne has a really good bus service for a small rural town. All the large supermarkets have bus stops nearby as do most residential areas. Nearby towns and villages including Belper, Brailsford, Brassington, Buxton, Carsington Water, Derby, Earl Sterndale, Ellastone, Hulland Ward, Leek, Longnor, Matlock, Uttoxeter & Wirksworth are all directly accessible by bus from Ashbourne.

Ashbourne bus station

Plus sign to indicate more information if clickedminus sign to indicate how to close this section and move on

Timetables

Plus sign to indicate more information if clickedminus sign to indicate how to close this section and move on

Tickets

Plus sign to indicate more information if clickedminus sign to indicate how to close this section and move on

The Swift: Ashbourne to Derby & Uttoxeter

Plus sign to indicate more information if clickedminus sign to indicate how to close this section and move on

Service 114: Ashbourne to Derby

Plus sign to indicate more information if clickedminus sign to indicate how to close this section and move on

Service 108: Ashbourne to Leek

Plus sign to indicate more information if clickedminus sign to indicate how to close this section and move on

Service 441 and 442: Ashbourne to Buxton

Plus sign to indicate more information if clickedminus sign to indicate how to close this section and move on

Service 113: Ashbourne to Belper

Plus sign to indicate more information if clickedminus sign to indicate how to close this section and move on

Service 110 and 111: Ashbourne to Matlock

Plus sign to indicate more information if clickedminus sign to indicate how to close this section and move on

Door to door service

Plus sign to indicate more information if clickedminus sign to indicate how to close this section and move on

Coach services

Plus sign to indicate more information if clickedminus sign to indicate how to close this section and move on

Ashbourne train services

Ashbourne does not have a train station but there are several within easy reach.  The Trainline or National Rail Enquiries are good sources of information on times and tickets.

Derby trains

Plus sign to indicate more information if clickedminus sign to indicate how to close this section and move on

Uttoxeter trains

Plus sign to indicate more information if clickedminus sign to indicate how to close this section and move on

Buxton trains

Plus sign to indicate more information if clickedminus sign to indicate how to close this section and move on

Matlock trains

Plus sign to indicate more information if clickedminus sign to indicate how to close this section and move on

Local history & heritage

Ashbourne's heritage is on multiple websites at the moment.  We are planning to bring it all together but meanwhile, you will need to do some surfing to find it all.  To start you off, see the link below to one of our favourite heritage websites.

Shrovetide football in black and white showing men in the river - perhaps taken more than fifty years ago
Ashbourne St John Street in black and white perhaps fifty years ago

WANT TO LEARN MORE…

www.ourashbourne.co.uk

Town map

See the map for the four main car
parks in the centre of town.

View map

How to reach Ashbourne

Ashbourne is situated in the Derbyshire Dales, near the centre of England, nestled in beautiful countryside on the southern edge of the Peak District National Park. It is close to a multitude of amenities and tourist destinations and has easy access to transport links.

The simplest way to get to Ashbourne is by car.  The nearest major city is Derby just twenty-five minutes away, whilst Stoke-on-Trent, Sheffield and Nottingham are all around one hour’s drive.  

The closest railway station is Derby, which has connections to most of the UK, including frequent direct services to London and Edinburgh.  Uttoxeter station connects to Crewe and Derby whilst Buxton station connects to Manchester and Sheffield.  

There are good bus links to Ashbourne from Derby, Uttoxeter, Buxton and Matlock as well as less frequent services from some of the surrounding villages.  See our community pages for more informationon buses.

Where to find Ashbourne

Ashbourne is situated in the Derbyshire Dales, near the centre of England, nestled in beautiful countryside on the edge of the Peak District.  It is close to a multitude of amenities and tourist destinations and has easy access to transport links.

Learn more

Shopping in Ashbourne

Ashbourne has a thriving independent retail community with traditional butchers, bakers, greengrocers and hardware stores alongside high end boutiques, bespoke jewellers, galleries, antique shops and gift shops to name just a few. The cobbled market place forms a bustling, historic centre to the town and is surrounded by a latticework of streets that entice you to explore.

Ashbourne is especially renowned for antiques with a row of shops nestling amongst the grade-1 listed buildings on Church Street.  The shop windows are something to behold, including one usually drawing crowds with a carefully curated display of vintage motorcycles.

Ashbourne is also destination shopping for lovers of designer fashion and bespoke jewellery with a surprisingly large selection of high-end shops for such a small town.  Mid-price and vintage shops are mixed in with the boutiques so there really is something for every taste and every budget.

Shopping in Ashbourne

Ashbourne has a thriving independent retail community with traditional butchers, bakers, greengrocers and hardware stores alongside high end boutiques, bespoke jewellers, galleries, antique shops and gift shops. The cobbled market place forms a bustling, historic centre to the town and is surrounded by a latticework of streets that entice you to explore.

Learn more

Ashbourne sports & activities

Ashbourne attracts residents who like the outdoor life and there are sporting clubs and societies to suit most interests as well as a multitude of activities for older or less active residents.

Sporting clubs and facilities range from running to football to cycling to fencing, several gyms, a leisure centre with facilities for squash,badminton and swimming pool, golf and tennis. Hobby/interest clubs include a U3A, WI, camera club and arts groups.  There is something for everyone.  

The annual Arts Festival now hosts more than 40 events and exhibitions across many genres.  There is live music most weekends and a new community cinema has proved a roaring success. Other keynote events include the Ashbourne Show, a triathlon, a marathon and half marathon, a soap box race, a Christmas lantern parade, a fireworks display and much more.  

Ashbourne sport & activities

Ashbourne attracts residents who like the outdoor life. There are sporting clubs to suit most interests as well as a multitude of activities & societies for older or less active residents.

Learn more
Ashbournes rich history

Ashbourne's history & architecture

Ashbourne's medieval architecture of yards and alleyways, fine Georgian houses, the old Elizabethan grammar school with its splendid Grade I listed facade, the almshouses and St Oswalds Church all combine to make Ashbourne a notable destination for lovers of architectural history.

There are more than a hundred listed buildings and structures in the town centre and it is well worthwhile setting aside a few hours to explore.

The church is one of Derbyshire’s treasures, named after the Anglo Saxon Saint Oswald, with parts of the building dating back to the 1200s. The magnificent 212ft spire was built in the 14th century and dominates the town’s skyline. 

The charming cobbled market place dates back to early medieval times. The building now hosting fish& chip shop has been there since the 1420s and several others are known to herald from that same century.

Thetimber-framed gingerbread shop - now a cafe and bakery - can be seen in St JohnStreet where the Original Ashbourne Gingerbread can still be bought.

Ashbourne's history & architecture

Ashbourne's medieval architecture of yards and alleyways, fine Georgian houses, the old Elizabethan grammar school with its splendid Grade I listed facade, the almshouses and St Oswalds Church all combine to make Ashbourne a notable destination for lovers of architectural history.

Learn more

Ashbourne's vibrant cafe scene

Add together the many cafes in central Ashbourne, plus a few more on the outer edges of town plus the many bars that also serve coffee and nibbles, and you could visit a different establishment every day of the month They vary from quiet & intimate to loud & bustling, and from bacon butty to designer brunch,so there are options to suit every mood and taste.  

As well as cafes, Ashbourne has an ever-increasing selection of boutique bars, set up by passionate owners to serve craft beer, real ale, fine wines and cocktails. For the traditionalist there are sports bars offering big screen viewing as well as darts and dominoes.

Other dining options range from pub-grub to gastropub to Thai & Indian.  Plus all the normal takeaway options that you would expect from a town this size. And of course pretty much everywhere now caters for the vegan, vegetarian and gluten-free diets.   Covid has prompted many establishments to open outside seating, so weather permitting, it is easy to enjoy eating outdoors in Ashbourne.

Ashbourne's vibrant cafe scene

Take the cafes in central Ashbourne, add in those a bit further out, mix in the many bars that also serve coffee and nibbles, and you are set to sample somewhere different, every day of the month.

Learn more
Ashbournes culture and community

Ashbourne's community

Ashbourne has grown significantly this century with new housing, investment by business & industry and a developing infrastructure. It is a friendly and welcoming town,with great schools, plenty of job opportunities and a caring community.  

The secondary school is Queen Elizabeth's Grammar School, founded in 1585, and whilst once a traditional grammar school it is now an academy open to all and is consistently rated as “outstanding” by Ofsted.  

The town has a thriving retail and service sector that has largely survived the attritions of covid.  The airfield industrial estate is expanding which will have a hugely beneficial economic impact on the town.  Thousands of new houses have been added since the millennium and house prices remain consistently above the regional average.

Many residents give up their precious time for the community and the voluntary sector includes transport, litter picking, rotary, scouts &guides amongst many.  The new pavilion for the recreation grounds has been entirely project-managed by volunteers.  

Ashbourne's community

Ashbourne has grown significantly this century with new housing and investment by business & industry. It is a friendly and welcoming town, with great schools, plenty of job opportunities and a caring community.

Learn more